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2010 Biolixi Ocean hurricane season
2010 Hurricane Season Summary
Season Summary

First Storm Formed:

June 3

Last Storm Dissipated:

November 17

Strongest Storm:

Sydney - 904 mbar 175 mph

Total Systems:

23

Named Storms:

21

Hurricanes:

10

Major Hurricanes:

5

Total Fatalities:

2114

Damage:

§205.3 billion

Other Seasons:

2009, 2010, 2011

The 2012 Biolixi Ocean hurricane season started on June 3 with the season's first named storm and hurricane, Abby. Then it came to the second named storm, which was the first major hurricane of the season, Barbara. The season pressed on creating two devestating systems, Roy and Sydney; and causing around (unknown) simoleons in damage together. The season then ended with the dissipation of Wilfred on November 17. 2010 was one of the most active years in the Biolixi Ocean, with a total of 21 named storms, 10 hurricanes, and 5 major hurricanes. 2010 was thought to over-top the list, which would then have to cycle to the back-up list, which is the names of the months.


Seasonal ForecastsEdit

The National Hurricane Center in Clark City predicted it to be a very acive season with around 22 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 4 major hurricanes.

Actual Numbers:

Named Storms: 21

Hurricanes: 10

Major Hurricanes: 5

StormsEdit

Timeline of EventsEdit

Tropical Storm Wilfred (2010)Tropical Storm Thomas (2012)Hurricane SydneyHurricane RoyTropical Storm Olivia (2010)Hurricane Noah (2010)Tropical Depression Thirteen (2010)Hurricane Loyd (2010)Tropical Storm Ivory (2010)Tropical Storm George (2010)Hurricane Dennis (2010)Hurricane Barbara (2010)Hurricane Abby (2010)

Hurricane AbbyEdit


Category 1 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Abby (2010).png Abby's Path (2010).png
Duration June 3 – June 7
Intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min),  984 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Abby (2010)

On June 1, a tropical wave emerged off the nothern coast of Southwest. The waved surged north towards Northwest, and due to favorable winds and moderate ocean temperatures, the tropical wave became the first storm of the season, Tropical Depression One. One continued its path to the north, this was very unusual because most systems the form in that area turn to the east. One soon became the first named storm of the season, Tropical Storm Abby during the afternoon hours on June 4. On June 5, the system was continued to be steered north and then began to turn to the northwest, towards the coast. On June 6, Abby became the first hurricane of the season with 85 mph winds before making a landfall in Northwest. Abby made landfall as a category 1 hurricane and then continued to push inland as a tropical storm. After being inland, Abby met with the Interchange Mountain Range which weakened the system drastically. On June 7, Abby dissipated into a remnant low dumping heavy rain across the country. Abby caused around 640.7 million simoleons in damage and killed 4 people.

Hurricane BarbaraEdit


Category 3 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Barbara (2010).png Barbara's Path (2010).png
Duration June 12 – June 17
Intensity 115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min),  955 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Barbara (2010)

On June 10, a tropical wave formed off the coast of the Eastern Biolixi Island. The wave traveled NE and began to show signs of organisation, and on June 12, the system became Tropical Depression Two around 300 miles off the coast of Virginia. Two moved to the ENE and strengthened along the way, and on June 13, Two became Tropical Storm Barbara with 40 mph winds. The National Hurricane Center predicted that Barbara would rather make a landfall in Virginia or continue to move east and make landfall on the San Francisco Peninsula. During the afternoon hours of June 13, Barbara strengthened into the second hurricane of the season about 200 miles off the coast of Virginia. On June 14, Barbara under went rapid intensification and became the first major hurricane of the season on June 15. Due to Barbara becoming a major hurricane, mandatory evacuations were ordered along the northern Virginia coast and the south-western coast of the San Francisco Peninsula. On June 16, Barbara became subject to wind shear and weakened drastically, afterwards Barbara quickly weakened into a tropical storm and made landfall near St. Anthony with 60 mph winds. On June 17, Barbara pushed further inland and weakened into a tropical depression and then dissipated into a remnant low. Barbara's totals are around 90 million simoleons and caused around 5 fatalities from rip currents.

Hurricane CharlotteEdit


Category 1 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Charlotte (2010).png Charlotte's Path (2010).png
Duration June 20 – June 23
Intensity 75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min),  987 mbar (hPa)

On June 18, a weak tropical wave formed off the coast of the Northern Biolixi Island. The weak wave tracked to the east and began to gain tropical characteristics. After gathering thunderstorm activity over warm waters, the tropical wave became Tropical Depression Three on June 20. Later the same day, the Three quickly strengthened, even though it wasn't predicted to intensify, and became Tropical Storm Charlotte on June 21. Charlotte was expected to remain a tropical storm and quickly dissipate once it entered the San Francisco Gulf according to the National Hurricane Center. But, due to favorable environment, Charlotte became a category 1 hurricane with 75 mph winds on June 22. After entering the San Francisco Gulf, Charlotte rapidly weakened from a hurricane down to a tropical storm during the late evening hours of June 22. On June 23, Charlotte weakened into a tropical depression and then dissipated after meeting the dry air that was present in the Gulf. Charlotte didn't cause any simoleons in damage but did cause 2 fatalities along the Virginia coast because of unusually strong rip currents produced by the storm.

Hurricane DennisEdit


Category 3 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Dennis (2010).png Dennis' Path (2010).png
Duration June 30 – July 5
Intensity 115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min),  961 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Dennis (2010)

On June 25, a large tropical wave was spawned off of a dissipating cold front and began to move E towards the Barrier Peninsula. On June 30, The tropical wave quickly gained organisation and then developed into Tropical Depression Four 405 miles SW off the coast of Frances Corner. Four continued to move to the east and had a projected path to continue to move to the east and then make a possible landfall somewhere in San Francisco. On July 1, Four intensified into Tropical Storm Dennis right off the coast of Frances Corner; the National Hurricane Center soon predicted Dennis to become a hurricane before any possible landfall. After becoming the fourth hurricane of the season with 85 mph winds, mandatory evacuations were ordered along the Barrier Peninsula. On July 2, Dennis made landfall on the Barrier Peninsula near the small town of Callisto as a category 2 hurricane. After landfall, Dennis quickly weakened due to the mountainous terrain. On July 3, Dennis under went rapid intensification while in the northern San Francisco Bay; Dennis became a major hurricane with 115 mph winds while over the warm bay waters. On July 4, wind shear became present and soon began to shear Dennis; Dennis rapidly weakened and made a second landfall as a category 1 hurricane near the small town of Jackele. After being inland on July 5, Dennis dissipated. Dennis caused 800 million simoleons in damage and killed 34 sims.

Tropical Storm EvanEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Evan (2010).png Evan's Path (2010).png
Duration July 10 – July 13
Intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min),  997 mbar (hPa)

On July 10, a quick forming tropical wave developed near the Biolixi Islands and began to move to the northeast. The tropical wave soon organised and became Tropical Depression Five on July 10. Four slowly began to intensify and became Tropical Storm Evan on July 11 due to lack of wind shear in the area. Evan persisted to the northeast and gained its peak intensity of 50 mph and minimum pressure of 997 mbar. Evan was predicted to continue to move to the northeast and not become a hurricane according to the National Hurricane Center. On July 12, Evan began to weaken due to moving over colder waters and due to moderate wind shear. On June 13, Evan quickly weakened into a tropical depression and then dissipated later that evening. Evan caused no known damage or deaths.

Tropical Storm FelixEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Felix (2010).png Felix's Path (2010).png
Duration July 15 – July 18
Intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min),  995 mbar (hPa)

On July 12, a tropical wave associated with a moisture flow from the Biolixi Islands began to show signs of organisation. On July 14, the tropical wave was given a 90% chance of development by the National Hurricane Center as it continued to receive moisture and warm ocean temperatures. On July 15, the tropical wave quickly strengthened into Tropical Depression Six. Six moved to the northeast and was in the presence of a steering low; the low gradually steered Six to the northeast as it intensified into Tropical Storm Felix on July 16. Felix pressed to the northeast and soon began to turn to the north, then northwest as it reached the top portion of the steering low. Felix was rotated around the steering low and began to make a loop in its path; once Felix had reached the southern end of the low, it began to move back to the northeast. On July 18, Felix was sheared as the steering low passed it, thus degenerating Felix into a tropical depression and then a post-tropical cyclone on July 18. Felix caused no known damages or deaths.

Tropical Storm GeorgeEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm George (2010).png George's Path (2010).png
Duration July 20 – July 22
Intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min),  991 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Tropical Storm George (2010)

On July 19, a quickly intensifying tropical wave developed to the south of the Southern Biolixi Island. The tropical wave quickly gained tropical characteristics and became Tropical Depression Seven on July 20. Later on July 20, Seven intensified into Tropical Storm George. George at first had a predicted path to become a hurricane and make landfall on the Eastern Biolixi Island, but due to unfavorable winds, George only stayed a tropical storm throughout its lifetime. George soon quickly shifted to the north and produced heavy rain along the coasts of the Biolixi Islands. On July 21, George became trapped between two high and low pressure systems, thus making George stationary while in between all three Biolixi Islands. After the systems began to shift, George began to jog to the east and south and began to be exposed to wind shear. George then quickly dissipated because of strong wind shear in the area on July 22. George produced heavy rainfall and strong rip currents along the coasts of the Biolixi Islands; George caused around 830 million simoleons in damage and 14 fatalities.

Tropical Storm HaroldEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Harold (2010).png Harold's Path (2010).png
Duration July 24 – July 25
Intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min),  1000 mbar (hPa)

On July 24, a tropical wave developed and quickly gained tropical characteristics and became a tropical depression, Tropical Depression Eight. Eight steadily moved to the southeast at a near stationary postion and was forecatsed to remain a tropical depression. But due to warm ocean waters, Eight became Tropical Storm Harold during the late evening hours of July 24. Harold still moved steadily to the southeast due to a driving high pressure and frontal system that was yanking the system behind it. Harold soon gained its peak intensity of 45 mph and pressure at 1000 mbar during the morning hours of July 25. During the afternoon hours of July 25, Harold was exposed to wind shear and drastically weakened. Harold quickly weakened into a tropical depression and then a post tropical cyclone after it had lost all convection during the evening hours of July 25. Harold was a system that remained well out to sea and caused no damage or fatalities.

Tropical Storm IvoryEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Ivory (2010).png Ivory's Path (2010).png
Duration July 30 – August 6
Intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min),  989 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Tropical Storm Ivory (2010)

On July 28, a quickly forming tropical wave formed off the coast of the Eastern Biolixi Island. The tropical wave moved off the the ENE and began to intensify. On July 30, the tropical wave intensified into Tropical Depression Nine and continued its track to the San Francisco Gulf. Nine soon strengthened into Tropical Storm Ivory on July 31. Ivory slowly drifted into the San Francisco Gulf and continued to intensify with 50 mph winds. On August 2, Ivory attained its peak intensity of 70 mph and pressure of 989 mbar; the National Hurricane Center predicted Ivory to slowly move towards the coast and possibly make landfall as a minimal hurricane. Due to its predicted path, evacuations were allowed along all beaches in San Francisco. On August 3, Ivory made landfall as a 65 mph storm near the city of Tree Beach. Ivory produced extremely heavy rain due to moving slowly across the peninsula, flooding was the main impact from Ivory. Ivory was predicted to degenerate into a tropical depression due to the mountainous terrain, but due to Ivory's size, it easily moved over the peninsula and and into the San Francisco Bay. On August 5, Ivory slowly moved over the bay and made landfall near the city of Potomar and produced severe flash flooding in the area. Clark City reported an estimated 4 inches of rain at their airport. On August 6, Ivory quickly dissipated after being inland for 5 hours. Ivory caused 780 million simoleons in damage and 17 fatalities.

Hurricane JoshuaEdit


Category 2 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Joshua (2010).png Joshua's Path (2010).png
Duration August 9 – August 15
Intensity 110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min),  972 mbar (hPa)

On August 6, a tropical wave developed in between the coasts of Northwest and Southwest and began to moved eastward. The tropical wave quickly attain tropical characteristics and continued to organise on August 7. On August 9, the tropical wave fully developed into a tropical cyclone and became Tropical Depression Ten. Ten slowly moved off the the east and continued to strengthen due to warm waters, the National Hurricane Center predicted Ten to continue to the east, then dip a little to the SE due to an oncoming low and then begin to curve off the the northwest. It was unknown rather the system would become a hurricane or not due to rapidly changing upper-level winds, but it was given a very high chance of becoming at least a tropical storm. On August 10, Ten began to dip to the south because of a oncoming low and rapidly became Tropical Storm Joshua due to moisture being flowed into the system after the low had passed. Joshua soon began to move to the east and then began to move to the north. Due to rapidly changing upper-level winds, Joshua stayed a tropical storm for a long period of time. On August 13, Joshua officially became a hurricane and broke the streak of five constant tropical storms during the season. On August 14, Joshua quickly raced off to the northwest and became a category 2 hurricane with maximum winds of 110 mph. Joshua then began to rapidly weaken due to moving into much colder waters. Joshua compeletly dissipated on August 15. Joshua caused no known damage.

Tropical Storm KadeEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Kade (2010).png Kade's Path (2010).png
Duration August 13 – August 16
Intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min),  996 mbar (hPa)

On August 12, a tropical wave formed from a cold front that had swept through the Biolixi Islands. The tropical wave began showing signs of rapid organisation as it moved to the north. On August 13, the tropical wave became Tropical Depression Eleven and continued to move north. Eleven was only expected to remain a tropical depression due to forming over cooler waters; but a moisture flow swept through the area giving the system more moisture thus warming the system itself. The strong flow of moisture pushed Eleven to the east and turned into Tropical Storm Kade on August 14. Kade remained a healthy tropical storm because of the never endless supply of moisture coming from the Biolixi Islands; it gained its peak intensity with 60 mph winds and minimum pressure of 996 mbar. On August 15, the stream of moisture moved out and Kade began to rapidly weaken as it began to move to north once again; Kade weakened into a tropical depression during the early hours of August 16, Kade then rapidly weakened and dissipated later the same day. Kade caused no known effects.

Hurricane LoydEdit


Category 4 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Loyd (2010).png Loyd's Path (2010).png
Duration August 18 – August 28
Intensity 155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min),  927 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Loyd (2010)

On August 16, a tropical wave developed off the coast of Southwest. The wave tracked to the east towards the Northern Biolixi Island and quickly began to show signs of organisation. The tropical wave quickly strengthened into Tropical Depression Twelve on the early morning hours of August 18. Twelve stayed a tropical depression for a steady amount of time, this made the National Hurricane Center confused because of the fact that it was in a very favorable environment; Twelve was expected to intensify as the week progressed. On August 19, Twelve developed into Tropical Storm Loyd with 50 mph winds and was now beginning to curve to the east-northeast. Systems that typically form in the area where Loyd was, usually begin to access that curving flow to the north and then the west. Since Loyd was a little lower than normal systems and was beginning to curve, this brought some concern to the citizens of the Northern Biolixi Island because storms that curve end up being intense. On August 20, Loyd became a category 1 hurricane with 90 mph winds and made landfall during the afternoon hours. Even though Loyd packed a punch to the island, citizens were a little relieved that Loyd didn't intensify into something stronger like they anticipated. After making landfall Loyd weakened into a tropical storm and then moved back out into open water where it began to intensify on August 21 to the 22. Immediately after moving over open waters, Loyd began to rapidly intensify. Loyd had a forecast of possibly becoming a category 5 hurricane as the week progressed. On August 23 to 24, Loyd strengthened into a category 2, then a 3. On August 25, Loyd became a category 4 hurricane and was still expected to intensify as it continued to curve to the northwest. During the evening hours of August 26, the time that the National Hurricane Center predicted a category 5 hurricane , Loyd gained its peak intensity with 155 mph winds, just below category 5 hurricane status, and minimum pressure of 927 mbar. Afterwards, Loyd remained a category 4 hurricane and then began to rapidly weaken starting on later in the day on August 26. Loyd rapidly weakened as it merged with dry air and colder waters and then dissipated on August 28. Loyd caused an estimated 850 million simoleons in damage and 10 fatalities in the Northern Biolixi Island.

Tropical Depression ThirteenEdit


Tropical depression (SSHS)
Tropical Depression Thirteen (2010).png Tropical Depression Thirteen's Path (2010).png
Duration August 22 – August 23
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min),  1002 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Tropical Depression Thirteen (2010)

On August 20, an area of low pressure developed in the northern half of the San Francisco Gulf. The low pressure area quickly organised and remained stationary off the coast bringing several inches of rain to the area. The disturbance was monitored carefully to see if it would develop into something or not, it was only given a 40% chance of development by the National Hurricane Center. The disturbance was not expected to develop due to moving to close to land, but since the center of the system remained over water and continued to stall, the disturbance was upgraded into Tropical Depression Thirteen on August 22. Soon after being classified a tropical depression, it began to move to the north towards the northern coast of San Francisco. Due to being too close to land and moving towards it, it was not expected to become a tropical storm, only a strong tropical depression. Thirteen then moved inland during the early morning hours of August 23 and then began to dissipate. Thirteen degenerated into a remnant low later the same day on August 23. Thirteen dumped an estimated 17 inches of rain in some areas that were already saturated, Thirteen's main impacts, like most tropical depressions that affect land, was heavy and flooding rain. Thirteen caused about 80 million simoleons in damage and caused 1 fatality.

Tropical Depression FourteenEdit


Tropical depression (SSHS)
Tropical Depression Fourteen (2010).png Tropical Depression Fourteen's Path (2010).png
Duration August 23 – August 27
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min),  1005 mbar (hPa)

On August 20, a vigorous tropical wave developed just outside of the Biolixi Islands. The tropical wave began to move to the east-northeast, and soon became Tropical Depression Fourteen on August 23. Fourteen drifted slowly to the east-northeast, and was predicted to become a tropical storm, but due to drier air and below average water temperatures in the area, Fourteen remained a tropical depression. On August 25, Fourteen began to become stationary as a low pressure system formed in front of it. The low pressure system then began to move to the east, taking Fourteen along with it. On August 27, Fourteen was completely absorbed by dry air and dissipated later the same day.

Hurricane MariaEdit


Category 1 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Maria (2010).png Hurricane Maria's Path (2010).png
Duration August 30 – September 6
Intensity 90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min),  978 mbar (hPa)

On August 28, a tropical wave developed north of the Biolixi islands and began to move east. The tropical wave soon began to create a healthy center with deep convection and an area of low pressure. On August 30, the tropical wave quickly strengthened into Tropical Depression Fifteen. Fifteen was expected to become a tropical storm the next day, but due to colder waters, Fifteen remained a tropical depression until August 2. On August 2, Fifteen became Tropical Storm Maria with 60 mph winds. After becoming a tropical storm, Maria began to move in a east-southeasterly direction due to being pushed south by a low pressure system. Soon on August 4, the low became larger and began to push Maria even further south and became a category 1 hurricane. Maria then moved slowly southeast and gained its peak intensity with 90 mph winds and minimum pressure of 978 mbar. Afterwards, Maria began to move a little more to the east and began to rapidly weaken as it met drier air. On August 6, Maria weakened into a tropical storm, and then a tropical depression; Maria then dissipated later that same day.

Hurricane NoahEdit


Category 1 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Noah (2010).png Hurricane Noah's Path (2010).png
Duration September 4 – September 8
Intensity 80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min),  985 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Noah (2010)

On August 30, a tropical wave formed from a cold front that dipped south from Roanoke. The low pressure system sheared the other current system known as "Hurricane Maria", but it brought moisture to the area which spawned and area of low pressure. The low pressure area began to get sheared by the neighboring Hurricane Maria, so the system was shoved more to the east to let the other system pass. After Maria had dipped further to the south, the low pressure system began to rapidly organize and it soon became Tropical Depression Sixteen on September 4. Sixteen began to stall after developing due to Maria to its south and a high pressure system to its north and east, but once the eastern high pressure system began to move out on September 5, Sixteen began to move to the southeast. On September 6, Sixteen became Tropical Storm Noah with 50 mph winds and a projected path to affect land as a hurricane. Coastal watches were issued for rip currents and any tropical storm force winds. Later the same day, Noah became a category 1 hurricane which triggered hurricane warnings near the city of St. Anthony and into some parts of Gulf and Virginia. On September 7, Noah quickly raced towards the coast bringing concern that Noah would be a devastating system with flooding in an isolated mountainous area. During the evening hours of the same day, Noah made landfall with 80 mph winds which caused tremendous damage along the coast with storm surge and flooding rain. On September 8, Noah moved far inland and rapidly weakened due to the mountainous terrain, Noah dissipated during the evening hours on September 8. Noah caused an estimated 480 million simoleons in damage and caused about 7 deaths.

Tropical Storm OliviaEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Olivia (2010).png Olivia's Path (2010).png
Duration September 10 – September 16
Intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min),  992 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Tropical Storm Olivia (2010)

On September 8, the National Hurricane Center monitored a tropical disturbance a couple hundred miles off the coast of Roanoke. The tropical wave moved closer towards land and became Tropical Depression Seventeen on September 10. Seventeen continued to the east and remained a tropical depression due to dry air that was present. Seventeen soon began to move to the northeast on September 11, and became Tropical Storm Olivia. Olivia moved ever so slowly towards the coast of Gulf. At that time, Olivia's center of circulation was exposed due to wind shear that was present off the coast of Gulf. Olivia soon was caught in a very large inversion which stalled the system off the coast which brought devastating flooding rains along the coast for several days. On September 13, Olivia finally was free of the inversion and began to move inland with 65 mph winds; and since it was a large system in size, heavy rain was spread far inland. Olivia then began to be pulled off land and back into the Biolixi Ocean, off the coast of Roanoke. Olivia zigzagged off the north up the coast of Roanoke which also brought the same impacts that Olivia had already brought to Gulf. After moving to north at a slow pace, Olivia slowed even further as it moved to the northwest out to sea. On September 15, Olivia began to move rapidly to the northwest at a quicker pace and then weakened into a tropical depression. Olivia then dissipated on September 16.

Tropical Storm PatrickEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Patrick (2010).png Patrick's Path (2010).png
Duration September 18 – September 21
Intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min),  1002 mbar (hPa)

On September 16, a tropical wave developed to the northeast of the Biolixi Islands. The tropical wave began to gradually move to the east-northeast and became Tropical Depression Eighteen on September 18. Eighteen continued its path to the east-northeast and began to gradually strengthen. A steering low pressure system was located to the west of the system which began to pull it to the north and then northwest where it became Tropical Storm Patrick on September 19. Patrick continued to be pulled to the north and to the northwest and gained it peak intensity of 60 mph and minimum pressure of 1002 mbar. After being drived to the northwest over a long period of time, Patrick began to meet wind shear, which was present to the north of the steering low. The wind shear began to "fan-out" the outside clouds of Patrick which then began to gradually weaken the system. On September 20, Patrick weakened into a tropical depression after meeting even stronger winds shear. On September 21, the center of circulation was completely exposed which then caused Patrick to dissipate.

Hurricane RoyEdit


Category 3 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Roy.png Roy's Path (2010).png
Duration September 22 – October 2
Intensity 125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min),  952 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Roy

On September 19, a vigorous tropical wave developed from a cold front that formed off the Biolixi Islands. The wave began to move to the east and began to organize. The wave became Tropical Depression Nineteen on September 22 after meeting warmer waters and little wind shear. Nineteen moved slowly to the east for a few days due to no steering lows or fronts. On September 25, Nineteen became Tropical Storm Roy with 45 mph winds. Roy became subjected to no steering fronts or lows for a long period of time as it moved closer to the San Francisco Gulf. The National Hurricane Center closely monitored Roy as it didn't intensify as expected for several days. On September 29, Roy entered the San Francisco Gulf and finally became a category 1 hurricane with 80 mph winds. Roy then began to be steered by a low that was to the north of it and began to move faster as it approached the Gulf coast. At the time, the Governor of San Francisco ordered preparations along the coasts for the approach of Roy. Roy was originally expected to make landfall as a category 1 hurricane, but due to meeting even warmer waters and no wind shear, Roy rapidly intensified. After becoming a strong category 2 hurricane, mandatory evacuations were ordered along the entire coasts of the San Francisco Peninsula and San Francisco Bay. Roy became a major hurricane on September 30 and made landfall with 125 mph winds, decimating the coast. Roy then weakened as it moved over higher mountains. Roy then moved into the San Francisco Bay as a tropical storm and made landfall near Clark City with 60 mph winds causing mass flooding and gusty winds causing downed trees and power lines. Roy then gradually weakened as it moved further inland and became a tropical depression. Roy then dissipated on October 2. Roy caused and estimated 10.2 billion simoleons in damage and caused an estimated 42 deaths. Roy is one of the deadliest hurricanes to hit San Francisco.

Hurricane SydneyEdit


Category 5 hurricane (SSHS)
Hurricane Sydney.png Sydney's Path.png
Duration September 28 – October 5
Intensity 175 mph (280 km/h) (1-min),  904 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Hurricane Sydney

On September 26, a tropical wave developed to the north of the Biolixi Islands. The wave tracked to the east and quickly became more and more organized as it approached the San Francisco Gulf. On September 28, the tropical wave became Tropical Depression Twenty before entering the San Francisco Gulf. On September 29, Twenty became Tropical Storm Sydney as it entered the warm waters of the gulf. The San Francisco Gulf was very unusually favorable for rapid development of any system that formed or entered that area. No dry air or strong upper-level winds were present, thus rapidly strengthening Sydney. On September 30, Sydney became a category 1 hurricane, beginning its rapid intensification process. The National Hurricane Center monitored Sydney as it moved closer to the San Francisco Peninsula. The National Hurricane Center issued hurricane warnings and watches all along the coast when Sydney became a category 3 major hurricane on October 1. Soon Sydney began to move at a faster pace towards the coast. Extreme precautions were ordered including mandatory evacuations, all along possibly affected coasts. The National Hurricane Center predicted a landfall near the Tree Beach, but the forecast models dipped slightly southward to Coconut City. On October 2, Sydney became a category 5 hurricane with 175 mph winds, and made landfall at that same intensity slightly to the north of Coconut City, near the city of Irene. After Sydney's historic and deadly landfall, it began to rapidly weaken due to meeting land and mountains. On October 4, Sydney entered the San Francisco Bay as a category 1 hurricane, making landfall near Clark City. Sydney then moved inland and dissipated on October 5. Sydney is considered to be the most devastating system in San Francisco history with a record 190 billion simoleons in damage, and an astounding 1,000-2,000 deaths.

Tropical Storm ThomasEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Thomas (2010).png Thomas' Path (2010).png
Duration October 13 – October 18
Intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min),  993 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Tropical Storm Thomas (2010)

On October 11, a tropical wave developed from a cold front that came off the coast of Southwest. The tropical wave moved to the southeast and met warm waters near the coast of the Southern Biolixi Island and became Tropical Depression Twenty-One. Twenty-One quickly strengthened into Tropical Storm Thomas on October 13 just 40 miles off the coast of the Southern Biolixi Island. Thomas then moved inland with 45 mph winds; due to Thomas' shear size for a tropical storm, extreme flooding was widespread throughout the island as Thomas moved inland and then began to move slowly to the northeast. Thomas continued to move to the northeast after a non-tropical low developed to the west of it, steering Thomas to the north. Thomas then emerged back into warm water in between the coasts of the Southern Biolixi Island and Northern Biolixi Island. Thomas rapidly strengthened and was feared to become a hurricane when it reached its peak intensity of 60 mph on October 16. Thomas then made landfall on the Northern Biolixi Island with stronger winds but less wind due to slight wind shear. Thomas then moved quickly to the northwest and moved back out into water but still remained weak. Thomas weakened into a tropical depression and then dissipated on October 18. Thomas caused an estimated 270 million simoleons in damage, and caused around 4 deaths.

Tropical Storm VeronicaEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Veronica (2010).png Veronica's Path (2010).png
Duration October 24 – October 29
Intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min),  991 mbar (hPa)

On October 20, a tropical wave developed near the Tropical Cyclone Formation Axis and began to dip southeast due to a steering low to the north of it. The tropical wave then began to attain subtropical characteristics and was given an 80% chance of development by the National Hurricane Center. On October 24, the tropical disturbance became Subtropical Depression Twenty-Two. Twenty-Two continued to move to the southeast and began to strengthen due to meeting a more favorable environment. Twenty-Two became Subtropical Storm Veronica on October 25. Veronica then began to attain tropical characteristics as it continued to move to the southeast. Veronica attain tropical characteristics on October 26. During the same day, Veronica began to dip more southward due to the stationary low that began to dip to the south, which in turn began to shear Veronica. On October 27, Veronica made a loop to the north and then the east as the moved passed to the south of it, but Veronica was on the verge of dissipation after being heavily sheared. Veronica then moved to the northeast and then gained its peak intensity of 65 mph and minimum pressure of 991 mbar due to rapid intensification on October 28. Veronica then began to gradually weaken and became a tropical depression on October 29; in which later the same day, Veronica dissipated.

Tropical Storm WilfredEdit


Tropical storm (SSHS)
Tropical Storm Wilfred (2010).png Wilfred's Path (2010).png
Duration November 16 – November 17
Intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min),  1002 mbar (hPa)

Main Article: Tropical Storm Wilfred (2010)

On November 14, a cold front spawned a tropical wave a few hundred miles off the coast of Virginia. The tropical wave began to move to the east and began to quickly organize and soon became Tropical Depression Twenty-Three on November 16 just 50 miles off the coast of Virginia. Tropical storm warnings were issued all along the coasts that were expected to be affected by the storm. Later the same day, Twenty-Three became Tropical Storm Wilfred with 45 mph winds. Wilfred, the final named storm of the 2010 season, began to inch closer and closer to the Virginia coast. On November 17, Wilfred made landfall and gained its peak intensity at the same time. Wilfred's peak intensity was 45 mph winds and had minimum pressure of 1002 mbar. After moving inland, Wilfred quickly dissipated due to high mountains that it interacted with. Wilfred dissipated during the evening of November 17. Wilfred caused minimal damage, but flooding and mudslides were the most common impacts with Wilfred. Since Wilfred was named in the middle of November, it was thought that this year would top over the lists, which would have to cycle to the back-up list; which is the names of the months.

Storm NamesEdit

The following names were used for named storms that formed in the Biolixi Ocean in 2010. This is the same list used in 2004, with the exception of Evan, Felix, Ivory, and Patrick which were used to replace Edgar, Falcon, Iva, and Pamela respectively. The names that were not retired from this list will be used again in 2017. The names Evan, Felix, Ivory, and Patrick were used for the first time this year.

RetirementEdit

During the 7th session of the NHC Conference, the National Hurricane Center retired two names from their rotating lists. Roy and Sydney were retired due extensive damage and loss of life, they will be replaced by Rodney and Scott for the 2016 season.

See alsoEdit

Hurricane Seasons
2004 - 2005 - 2006 - 2007 - 2008 - 2009 - 2010 - 2011 - 2012 - 2013

Tropical cyclones in the 2010 Biolixi Ocean hurricane season
Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale
TD TS C1 C2 C3 C4 C5

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